A Multifaceted Approach Improves Menopause Symptoms

A study in 2018 looked at alternative therapies in contrast to prescribed HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy). Despite a non conclusive result mainly due to the individuals interpretation of symptoms and the limited clinical support during the trial, the conclusive discussion stated that the safest and most effective way to treat menopausal symptoms will be different for each woman and will involve a multifaceted approach incorporating diet, exercise, supplementation, and possibly reflexology. 

I have worked with clients who have expressed a reduction in their symptoms when they have made dietary changes, commenced taking supplements, introduced exercise (yoga) once a week and received reflexology once a week.

When we look at balancing the hormones it involves the endocrine system.

To romance and create a happy optimum functioning endocrine system you should aim to reduce stress within the body by:

  • Eating foods that are known to be anti-inflammatory and non digestive irritants
  • Free up the organ systems through gentle yoga postures that allow the body to stretch and organs rebalance and settle (particularly important if you have a job where you sit for prolonged time)
  • Take herbal supplements such as Black cohosh, Sage
  • Take vitamins and minerals B6, K2,D3 Magnesium, Boron, Calcium, Omega-3
  • Learn meditation
  • Achieve complete deep relaxation through either deep tissue massage or reflexology.

To make changes in your diet connect with me for a 60 minute video call and hear how easy it is to start working towards a healthier and happier menopause.

For those living in the Southport area (North West UK), I offer Reflexology and dietary advice combined. Click her to enquire.

Balance Hormones and Manage Menopause Naturally: Say Goodbye to ‘Hot Flushes’.

This week has seen a high number of enquiries relating to that life changing symptom ‘Hot Flushes’.

Whether you are in your perimenopause or menopause it is likely you are experiencing one or more of the more common symptoms listed below. If you can identify at least one of the symptoms on the list, then carry on reading this post, it could change your life.

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  • Decrease in menstruation/Absence of menstruation
  • Hot flushes
  • Night sweats
  • Flushing
  • Insomnia
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Weight gain
  • Dry skin
  • Sore tender breasts
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Lack of concentration
  • Memory problems
  • Reduced libido or sex drive
  • Irritability
  • Reduced muscle mass
  • Reduced bone mass
  • Thinning hair
  • …… there are many more……

You are unique and no two women will experience the same menopause, one thing that is common and causes the most concern are ‘Hot Flushes’ and night sweats. Many women restrict their daily activities as a result of severe flushes that prevent them from socialising and that in-turn brings further symptoms associated with the menopause such as depression and anxiety.
Managing ‘Hot Flushes’ is the focus of this post.

It is important that I mention here that I do not intend to diagnose or offer treatment, I am merely providing suggestions that have been successful for others. Always consult your medical practitioner prior to commencing any changes in your usual routine.

The menopause can occur at any age, though is more common in women 45+ and is a result of oestrogen levels falling which are necessary for regulating the menstrual cycle as it is the primary female sex hormone.

The menopause is a result of this change in hormone productivity and can cause many uncomfortable symptoms which can limit your daily activity.

These foods are for any woman who is in the perimenopause or menopause stage.

Flaxseeds –  A true power food. They contain omega-3 fatty acids and lignans. They are said to have anti-oestrogen properties and are currently being studied in relation to their ability to prevent cancer.

How to add Flax seeds to your daily diet: Sprinkle on top of your yogurt, add to your smoothie or visit the internet to be inspired. I love this recipe for Flaxseed Crackers.

Now I know I typically advocate all things free from dairy and animal products, though I feel I must inform you of the powerful properties found in Bone broth. If you are truly experiencing extreme ‘hot flushes’ you should notice some relief after consuming bone broth every day. Symptoms should improve after 3-4 days. You need to maintain a regular intake, suggested maintenance intake is three servings a week.

It is excellent for joint health, collagen, flexibility and organ connective tissues. Bone broth has been traditionally used for many years to support prolapse of organs as it helps the connective tissues remain elastic and boost the collagen production.

Bone Broth is traditionally used to prevent prolapse of organs due to its acclaimed power of helping strengthen connective tissues that support organs within the body.

Bone broth also has been used to support healthy skin, hair, nails and reduce dry skin condition.

Many of you will know how much I love fermented foods. They are a true power house of probiotics that can help alleviate many common symptoms. Fermented foods contain natural probiotics and enzymes and the fibre in the vegetables supports your digestive system.

Sauerkraut is also a great source of vitamin C  and K, potassium, calcium and phosphorous. Not only does it reduce inflammation it has been known to help reduce symptoms of depression.

Sauerkraut is the easiest to add to your daily diet and there are plenty of recipes on the internet.

A word of caution here – the shop sold Sauerkraut is often made with vinegar which restricts the growth of Lactobacillus.

Black Cosh is amazing to reduce night sweats.

Dong Quai has been used in traditional Chinese  herbal medicine for many years and this herb has been shown to reduce hot flushes, insomnia and fatigue. Available in capsule form

The essential oil Ylang Ylang is great for massage, and is known to relax the nervous system.

It is a challenge to have a truly balanced diet that delivers all the essential nutrients for maximum cell function. There are many supplements known to support you during menopause, these are the more common ones:

Vitamin D3 –  decreased levels of oestrogen during menopause can be boost by Vitamin D which helps support moods

Vitamin K2 – helps to protect against bone loss and brain health

B6 vitamins B6 is known to help mental clarity and

Boron – helps prevent calcium loss and bone mass loss

Magnesium – can help promote sleep and improve mood.

Collagen – joint pain is common during the menopause, collagen can help reduce skin conditions and joint health

Gall Bladder – A Key Player in Digestive Health

Your gall bladder is a reservoir for bile; a highly alkaline that controls the acidity of the stomach contents as it arrives in the duodenum.

When food enters the small intestine, a hormone called cholecystokinin is released, signaling the gallbladder to contract and secrete bile into the small intestine through the common bile duct.

The bile helps the digestive process by breaking up fats. It also drains waste products from the liver into the duodenum, a part of the small intestine.

An excess of cholesterol, bilirubin, or bile salts can cause gallstones to form. Gallstones are generally small, hard deposits inside the gallbladder that are formed when stored bile crystallises. A person with gallstones will rarely feel any symptoms until the gallstones reach a certain size, or if the gallstone obstructs the bile ducts. Surgical removal of the gallbladder (cholecystectomy) is the most common way to treat gallstones.

Poor eating habits and foods high in sugars and fats can contribute to gallbladder disease and gallstones. A diet with less fat and more fiber can prevent gallstones and improve your health.

Fried and fatty foods are more difficult to break down and can cause pain. Increasing nutrient-rich foods in your diet, such as vegetables and fruits, can improve gallbladder function and prevent complications.

Liver Fatigue can lead to symptoms of poor circulation, digestive problems, headaches, skin related allergies and hormonal imbalances.

Bile that is stored in the gall bladder is necessary for absorption of fat soluble materials and supports the removal of toxins.

Detoxification of the liver is complex though there are some key elements that can easily be incorporated into your daily diet.

Eat your greens – Kale, Cabbage, Broccoli. Dark leafy vegetables are bursting with chlorophyll which can neutralise toxins.

Turmeric can help fight infections, reduce inflammation and aid digestion. It stimulates bile production and excretion via the gall bladder, improving the body’s ability to digest fats.

This radish based juice is powerful. Radish stimulates bile production. Mixed with the protein from the sprouts this alkalising juice has a nice kick to it.

1/2 cup of red radishes (6 small) trimmed, 1/2 cup of alfalfa or sunflower sprouts, 1 red apple (cored), 1 cup of chard, 1 cucumber.
If you do not have a juicer, you can hand blend this and then push through a sieve.

Alfalfa Srouts

Sunflower Sprouts

Juicer

Gall Bladder Health

Liver Fatigue

Optimum Nutrition Gold Standard 100% Plant – Chocolate Flavour 684g 19 Servings – ON Vegan Protein Powder with Pea & Rice Protein No SOYA

Well I know I am a nutritionist and my first line of attack on my clients is natural food but I am going to shout from the roof tops over this amazing protein powder.

Never have I tasted a protein powder that doesn’t have at least some powder after taste, this is just good taste from the first sip to the last dregs of the beaker.

I love it and when you read the reviews I am not alone in saying it is amazing especially when mixed with almond milk.

Click the images to purchase or read more about the product.

To Keto – or Not to Keto…….

Keto Diet

Everybody’s doing the keto diet. It’s a cultural craze that’s captured our imagination.

But let’s remember that the ketogenic diet is a medical, or therapeutic, diet. So while it’s extremely beneficial for people with certain conditions, it’s not for everyone.

What do you eat on the keto diet?

The keto diet is essentially a high-fat diet — your meals are 70 or 80 percent fat; about 20 percent protein; and about 5 percent carbohydrate. It is not an Atkins high-protein diet.

The keto diet switches you from burning glucose (which carbs provide) to burning ketones (which fat produces) for energy. When you do this, interesting things happen:

  • Your metabolism speeds up.
  • Your hunger goes away.
  • Your muscle mass increases.
  • Your blood pressure and heart disease risk profile improve.

Why will eating fat help you burn fat?

Biology is smart. Historically, it allowed our bodies to adapt to times of abundance or scarcity by shifting from carbohydrate metabolism to fat metabolism.

The key is this: Eating fat does not make your insulin go up, as eating carbs or protein does. So the keto diet does not spike your insulin, and you don’t store fat. Instead, you burn it, creating the ketones that give you an effective and efficient metabolic jolt.

Many of my clients struggle with sourcing Keto type foods, I direct them to the PanetOrganic Keto Shop page.

Click here to view Keto Carbalternatives
Click here to view Keto Offers
Click here to view Keto Sweeteners
Click here to view Keto Fats
Click here to view Keto Fermented Foods
Click here to view Keto Pantry
Click here to view Keto Soups and Broths
Click here to view Keto Supplements and Protein Powders
Click here to view Keto drinks